Director Doug Liman reignites the sexual misconduct allegations of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh in the by-the-book documentary ‘Justice.’

SteveRamosMedia
3 min readJan 21, 2023

The sexual misconduct allegations regarding Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh return to the spotlight in director Doug Liman’s by-the-rules documentary ‘Justice.’

The sexual misconduct allegations regarding Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh return to the spotlight in director Doug Liman’s Documentary ‘Justice.’ Photo courtesy of the Sundance Film Festival.

There’s one metric measuring the success of director Doug Liman’s political documentary Justice, a thorough investigation into the sexual misconduct allegations of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. After watching approximately 87 minutes of the last-minute 2023 Sundance Film Festival addition, do you leave veteran director Doug Liman’s first documentary project more convinced of Kavanaugh’s guilt? If you’re like the many progressive-minded attendees and me at Sundance, the answer is a resounding ‘yes.’ If you support Kavanaugh’s conservative ideology, there are no ‘gotcha’ moments in the movie to embarrass your support. That’s the challenge with by-the-book, talking heads, face-the-camera documentaries like Justice. They’re enjoyable for the target audiences but need to make an impact outside of topic devotees.

Justice begins its story with Liman on camera speaking to Christine Blasey Ford, who testified in 2018 supporting her accusations of attempted rape by Kavanaugh in high school in the early 1980s. Ford sits carefully on the edge of the camera frame. She asks Liman about his goal for making the documentary. It’s a great question that Liman and writer/producer Amy Herdy answer by the film’s finish. It remains unclear whether the movie will activate its goals and truly impact justice for women.

Liman and writer/producer Amy Herdy (Allen v. Farrow) condense hours of stock cable news footage of Ford and Kavanaugh into an efficient summation of the divisive hearings. They complement the news footage with fast-paced interviews of Ford’s childhood friends and psychologists explaining how people remember past traumas and the impact of a boys-will-be-boys rationalization for Kavanaugh’s behavior.

The documentary film’s freshest scenes involve Deborah Ramirez, a woman who accused Kavanaugh of sexual abuse while they attended Yale University in a 2028 New Yorker article. Liman goes beyond the well-known magazine story to tell a fuller picture…

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SteveRamosMedia

Inventive marketing professional with over 15 years of industry experience. Created over 300 business stories for major media brands. steve@steveramosmedia.com